Vehicle Based Problem Solving; Intro

Some folks asked about vehicle based tactics, and my approach to the problem. I thought I’d share a few thoughts in this series of posts on the subject. For much of this endeavor Einstein’s recommendation to make things as simple as possible but no more simple is the best advice. This is really important when studying the subject of violence, particularly criminal violence. It’s easy to go off the rails, and down into the weeds wasting time, energy, and money. Worst case we set ourselves up to fail when we need our training the most.

 

First let’s look at some data. The US Department of Justice has compiled the following stats regarding car jackings in the US. Take a few moments to click the link, and read through this. It’s only three pages however, it contains solid information relevant to this series. Here is some of the most relevant data; a majority of the incidents involved one victim, within 5 miles of their home, more than one attacker, and the attackers were almost always males. A majority of the attackers were armed yet despite this we find the victims usually resisted. Good on them.

 

There are also a host of videos from various sources that show us real time carjackings, (also referred to as vehicular hijacking in some states), as well as armed robberies, and other violent crimes which occur in and/or around a vehicle. These sources give us a starting point from which to realistically begin to solve the problem. In this series we’ll cover some counter assault tactics that are realistic, and relevant to the private citizen.

 

What I won’t cover are things I’ve learned, and used as part of a tactical team in Law Enforcement. I have had the opportunity to receive a lot of training in vehicle takedowns, interdictions, and counter assault tactics. I’ve also had the opportunity to apply this training on the job in law enforcement as well as on protective details. The reason I won’t bother to share any of that training isn’t because of some operational security concerns. It’s because while all that stuff is a rush there is little carry-over from team tactics to the needs of a private citizen. I tend to think all that training is virtually useless when it comes to my needs as a private citizen going about my day. All of the training, and application was in a team environment with the focus on taking offensive action. Extensive planning, and rehearsal with all contingencies covered, geared up, and every tool necessary available to me. Contrast that with driving through my neighborhood with the only plan being to get to my house without incident, and the only tools I have are at most a standard issue concealed carry setup. The only team mates I have are whatever dog jumped in the car as I was leaving the house or maybe one or two of my kids. Sometimes I’ll have another an equally trained and equipped friend or two riding with me but not often.

 

So… with all that in mind you’ll better understand my approach to the problem as we get started. Nothing super sexy, no ninja rolls, no bounding, no rolling out of the vehicle with a rifle, no covering fire as our  partner drops back to gun up with the rifles in the trunk. Just simple, easily applied concepts, and principles to help us solve the problem of a criminal assault in and/or around a vehicle.