Swing For The Fence, II

In the first post of this series we talked about some fundamental technique. In this post I want to expand upon some of those elements. In the first post I wrote about techniques that work well if we have a bit of distance between ourselves, and our opponents. This time I want to share with you a tactic that works well when we want to keep our opponents off of us, and maintain striking distance particularly when using a shorter impact weapon.

 

The challenge in impact weapon fighting aka stick fighting has always been to keep our opponent in that sweet spot, that perfect range where we can apply the most force to our target. Hitting them at the peak of our swing so they experience the joy of that pain train crashing up their spine, and into their brain, shutting them down or at least making them want to quit. Every shot we can land of that order is a deposit into the making-them-quit bank account. However, on the receiving end we are looking to crash through that range or stay outside of that range while pot shotting their lead arm, and leg.

 

Enter Piston Striking. This is a simple tactic that keeps your opponent right there in the sweet spot. Think of how a piston works. If one piston is up, the piston on the opposite side is down. Watch this if you need a mental image. Even if you don’t need help understanding how pistons work, watch this because it’s pretty cool. You’re going to mimic this action with your arms. Your non-weapon bearing arm comes out in a straight shot essentially stiff arming your opponent, keeping them off of you, while the rotation of this shot cocks your weapon bearing arm by rotating your weapon bearing arm back. Fire the weapon bearing arm striking your opponent with the impact weapon while retracting your non-weapon bearing arm. The movement is still on the X so your firing a 1-2 combo however, in a rotational path due to the nature of the impact weapon. This is a non-stop salvo. You want to be firing lefts-rights repeatedly, one after another. Non-weapon bearing arm popping your opponent off of you, and keeping them off of you while the weapon bearing arm is landing clean shots with the impact weapon.

 

For a simple training progression I would suggest starting on a heavy bag in what would usually be boxing or striking range. Practice slowly throwing a jab with your non-weapon bearing hand then throwing a strike with your weapon bearing hand similar to a cross as you retract your jab. Begin with 5-10 rounds to work on your sense of range, and timing. This is where having solid Boxing mechanics comes into play. There is a lot of carry-over from throwing hands with bad intentions to striking effectively with an impact weapon in this range. After some time on a heavy bag, it’s time to work this tactic using Thai pads. Have your training partner feed by trying to slowly crash the range, making you work to keep them off of you with straight shots with the non-weapon bearing arm while landing shots with your impact weapon. Again, work 5-10 rounds a session, getting a feel for the timing, and distance now with a live feeder. Once your good to go with a feeder it’s time to add some more resistance. Using soft sticks agree with your training partner to stay in this range. Don’t allow yourself to be sucked into a full on sparring session. If you crash the range have a set time to work to get yourself unentangled. If you can’t get unentangled, break clean, and restart. Have your training partner simply work to crash, so you can focus on keeping him or her off of you, and in that sweet spot where you can land clean shots. Use your imagination and continue to add resistance until you go to integration phase where you incorporate this tactic into full sparring to test your ability to apply this against full resistance.

 

Give it a whirl, let me know how you like it, and how it works for you.

What is First?

First Things First by Stephen Covey is a great book on time management. It takes us deeper into Covey’s system for managing our most valuable asset; time. During a seminar on time management one of the presenters said something that pertains to working towards our goals and objectives that stuck with me. He said; the first thing you do upon waking is the first thing. If the first thing I do upon waking isn’t taking me towards my goals, then I need to think about my goals, and what’s really important to me.

 

If one of my goals is to improve my Jiujitsu escapes from bottom then the first thing I should be doing upon waking is something that takes me closer to this goal. Get out of bed, and get the coffee brewing. While I’m waiting for my coffee I can do hip escapes/shrimps,  bridges/upas, sit-outs or any number of solo drills that prime my mind and body to think all day about my goal of improving my Jiujitsu.

 

This also applies to any other goal in the multidisciplinary practice. If we want to improve our pistol skills then the first thing I should do is dry practice. If I want to level up my standup game then I should be shadowboxing as soon as I’m awake enough to move around. The mental act of starting to work on reaching my goal as soon as I’m awake is important. It sets the tone and pace for the day. Coach Cecil Burch of Immediate Action Combatives has spoken and written quite often about using every available minute for our daily practice as we are all on a time crunch. Those moments while waiting for our coffee to brew, or the shower water to regulate is a few more minutes or reps.  It’s a simple way to get into the mental state of using every available moment when we start our day working on our goal.

 

As I recall the presentation on time management, and reaching goals I think about how many times I have started my day looking at what others are doing. I surf social media to see what my friends, and family are doing, check emails, or my RSS feed. While these things are all interesting, there is a good chance none of these things are helping me reach my goals. I have effectively told myself what others are doing is more important than my goals, and what I want to do. It might sound self serving yet, I think it’s okay to focus on ourselves and our goals for the first few moments of the day.

 

Think about your goals. Think about how you start your day. If those two things aren’t congruent maybe it’s time to put yourself and your goals first, at least for the first part of your day. Try it for a few weeks, and see if it doesn’t move you closer to reaching your goals.

 

What Would You Do?

*Disclaimer – My attorney really appreciates when I stay out of these discussions. However, a few friends have sent this one to me and asked my opinion. I won’t get into any kind of discussion that will cause Tim or Suyash to call me. I promise.*

Usually when friends ask my thoughts on a use of force or response to resistance incident that makes the news they will ask, “what would you have done?” It’s difficult to answer these questions because I’m not there, and having done this for some time I’ve watched a lot of people jump to conclusions on either side only to find there is more to the story. For those reasons, and more I tend to avoid these discussions.

However, I will discuss training issues I see, (admittedly from the luxury of my Monday morning quarterback position), and how I think this could be handled better in a world of good, better, and best options. Also understanding that my perspective is skewed because I’m pretty good at Brazilian JiuJitsu, Wrestling, and Judo so I’m confident in my ability to out grapple most people I encounter, and the ones I can’t out grapple I can still hang with for a little while before they catch me. I realize that might sound arrogant but it’s just a fact that also colors my perspective when it comes to these things.

Okay, lets dive in…

 

1) I wouldn’t use a baton/impact weapon at that point. The suspect is on the ground, still resisting, (I think), but not throwing punches. Now is the time to switch gears and establish control. More pain in the form of strikes won’t, and isn’t gaining compliance. We have to guard against fixating on the tool driven action we’re performing. When it’s time to transition we have to be ready to transition quickly to a more effective tactic. The strategical objective is to get the suspect into cuffs, not ineffectively swing a baton.

 

Coach Chris Haueter covering the fine points of the knee ride with me circa 2002. Although I’ve been perfecting this position for quite some time even a rudimentary understanding of this position would help officers control the vast majority of the folks they encounter in a use of force incident.

2) He was set to knee ride, which is a dominant position. Use it. We use it all the time in JiuJitsu for a really good reason. It allows me to maintain control and have mobility in case a bystander gets involved. They weren’t getting involved beyond verbally so on to the next step. BTW, I’ve used the knee ride on actively resisting people to pin them, and wait them out. If I can knee ride athletes that train everyday to get out from under that pin, I can knee ride someone that never trains to get out. Criminal offenders for the most part are not athletes and in this video there seems to be a size/weight disparity that favors the officer so use it. Knee ride until they burn out/gas out, and they’re done fighting. Which leads me to number 3.

 

3) Control one of the arms using a Kimura/double wrist lock, using that hold to lock down her upper body turning her while moving the arm behind her. First cuff goes on.

Kimura aka Double Wrist Lock while in the S-Position. This is a photo from a SWAT Magazine article written by Ed Lawrence. Photo credit M Abonce

4) Turn again while maintaining control of the cuffed arm and she’ll go flat on her stomach, in the ISR Matrix series the guy’s call this the S-Position. S stands for safety. It’s safe for me, because from there I have a lot of control over the suspect, I can assess my surroundings to make sure no one else gets involved, and it’s safe for the suspect because they can’t do anything. They’re pinned. They can squirm but they’re not going anywhere. At this point in my career I’ve cuffed a metric ton of people from that position, quite a few of those people were much larger than me. 100% of the time there was no fight left in them because mentally they knew it was pointless since they couldn’t move.

 

5) This is why I keep beating that JiuJitsu drum. Everything I wrote above could be performed against a resisting opponent by any Blue or Purple belt in any JiuJitsu gym anywhere in the world. That’s not an exaggeration. Maybe even most seasoned White belts. Heck man, by the time I was a Blue belt I rarely used the tools on my belt because I had this supreme confidence that once I made contact with the suspect I would be able to outperform them, get them under control with minimal effort, and get them cuffed up. 99.99% of the people I ran into on the street that resisted were nowhere near as hard to deal with as most of my daily training partners. I felt no need for most of the tools I had to carry, and only did so because it was dictated by SOP.  Again, this might sound arrogant yet it’s the truth, I’ve never encountered anyone outside of the gym or competition that was a problem. To paraphrase Rickson Gracie; for someone trained in Jiujitsu a fight or use of force incident is the ocean, the JiuJitsu trained is like a shark and most people can’t even swim. 

 

6) What training would I recommend for most Police Officers? I’m biased because I am one of the co-creators of this system, (although I am no longer involved), I think the ISR Matrix is one of the best systems out there. We filmed the first series in the late 1990’s where we preached the message of pressure testing, incorporating Brazilian JiuJitsu and MMA into Police Officer’s training. I also highly recommend Cliff Byerly of Hill Country Combatives. Cliff has a wealth of knowledge and experience, and is highly dedicated to seeing the standard of training in Law Enforcement pushed to a higher level.

Just for giggles here is the original ISR Matrix trailer filmed in the late 1990’s. I make an appearance or three in this clip. Enjoy.

 

Thanks to Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training for encouraging me to make this a blog post.

Banged Up

“Strong people are harder to kill than weak people and more useful in general.” – Mark Rippetoe

At this point it’s virtually impossible to find someone that hasn’t read or heard this quote from Rippetoe, and for good reason. There is a lot of truth found in those words. In a recent social media post Ryan of Full Contact Runner on the subject of injuries Ryan talked about the frustration experienced when folks act as if the cause of our injury or illness is related to, and made worse by this lifestyle. As if we are somehow more susceptible to injury, and illness than someone that spends those same hours sitting on a couch. While we are definitely more likely to be injured, (as this lifestyle is a contact sport), it is still preferable to any other way of life. Most importantly, and something these critics fail to realize, is the simple fact that this lifestyle sets us up to recover from any injury or illness much faster, and with less complications. Because of this lifestyle we are strong therefore we are harder to kill, harder to knock down, and when knocked down we’re harder to keep down.

  • Using myself as an example; in 2007 I shattered my kneecap on a gig. It took surgery, and 8 months of therapy to get back in the saddle. I was told there were things I wouldn’t be able to do again, to include key aspects of my profession. I proved that to be untrue.
  • In 2010 I injured my lower back doing extensive damage to the discs and vertebrae at S1, L5, L4, and L3. I was told I would need major surgery, and would have to medically retire from my profession. I proved that to be untrue.
  • In 2011 I was hit with intense abdominal pain that went on for months. I ultimately ended up in the hospital with acute pancreatitis. I was in a bad state, and it resulted in surgery to repair the damage. I was told this is probably going to be something I would live with for the rest of my life. I’m able to manage this because of my lifestyle.
  • 2014 I had a brain hemorrhage with intra-cranial pressure/swelling. It was awesome. Probably the most intense pain I’ve ever experienced. I should have died. I didn’t. I was told I would have permanently altered gait, and other issues. I don’t.
  • During training cycles I’ve broken ribs, hands, feet, fingers, toes, teeth, my jaw, nose, and a metric ton of soft tissue injuries.

You’re probably wondering what’s the point of listing injuries and illness? To make a point which is; the common theme in every injury or illness was at some point, often multiple times a Doctor or other medical professional would tell me that the reason it wasn’t worse, and my recovery was faster than expected was because I arrived at that crisis point strong, healthy, and in great condition. I’m not alone in this, every one of my friends that have gone through any type of injury or illness relate the same story. Doctors and medical professionals telling them they made it, or they will recover because their strength levels when it started were so high. That’s the other side of this injury/illness coin the couch surfers don’t understand. The injuries we suffer in this game aren’t as bad as they would be if we were weak. The illnesses we go through in life, (by the way, both of my health crisis were unrelated to my lifestyle), would be much worse, and maybe even unsurvivable if we didn’t have a reservoir of physical and mental strength going into the situation.

So remember that the next time a critic points out that you’re “always” hurt, or you seem to be more susceptible to injury or illness that “never” seems to affect them. First, their perception might be skewed, to say the least. Second, while the injury part might be true since if we never get punched in the face what are the odds that we’ll get concussed? However, illnesses which is to some degree genetic hit all of us regardless of whether we follow a healthy lifestyle or not. Folks that never smoke a day in their life are diagnosed with cancer, and folks that never drink a day in their life come down with liver disease. It’s just the cards we’re dealt. The difference is a strong body gives the physicians, and other medical professionals more to work with to fight the illness, or even a traumatic event that landed us on the hospital bed in front of them. Get strong, stay strong, and ignore the critics.

 

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A powerful depiction of our role in helping the doctors and medical staff help us. Give them something to fight with, get as strong and healthy as possible. Thanks to Ryan of Full Contact Runner for sharing this photo. If your not following Ryan on social media check out his Facebook page at Full Contact Runner as well as his excellent blog of the same name.

 

Keeping the chassis aligned

In August 27th and 28th I had the amazing opportunity to teach my MDOC course for the folks at SBG Athens, GA. (For a review of that course, click here!) During this course I was in a lot of pain due to some old injuries. Fortunately for me, as well as the folks that call SBG Athens home, Steve Fogle is on staff and has studied Donnie Thompson’s body tempering methods.

Using something called an X-Wife, a heavy kettlebell, a bow-tie, Voodoo Floss, and a chinning bar Steve was able to work wonders on my shoulder in less than thirty minutes. At first I thought there is no way this guy can be serious. This hurts, in a good way, but this seems like something someone would do as a prank. I assure you, it was not a prank and the temporary discomfort was more than worth it for the improved range of motion and strength. For the first time in months my shoulder felt good and I was able to lift my arm over my head without pain. I would highly recommend you find someone well versed in Body Tempering.

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What should you do if you can’t find someone skilled in Body Tempering? Order some Voodoo Floss, (I do not benefit from your purchase of this product), watch their instructional videos found on the Voodoo Floss link above and get to work. Also search for a massage therapist that specializes in Myofascial Release. I’ve benefitted greatly from Myofascial Release work. I also see a Chiropractic Doctor in my area who has done wonders for my chassis. It helps that Dr Sikorsky is also an Ironman competitor, as well as a student of Mixed Martial Arts and Brazilian JiuJitsu so he understands the stress we place on our bodies. Dr Sikorsky also knows I’m not taking six weeks off from practice so telling me to rest is a waste of breath, fix me so I can keep training and show me how to work around the injury. As an athlete himself, he understands this drive.

 

Injuries, adhesions, broken or out of joint bones, and assorted injuries are just part of this lifestyle. Do not allow these things to take you away from doing what you love. Keep the chassis aligned and tuned so we can keep training as long as we breathe.