Want to Talk Mindset?

It’s impossible for me to discuss mindset without talking about hellacious practice and training sessions. Times when we couldn’t carry ourselves off the mat or out of the ring after practice. Times when we collapsed trying to walk to our car after a conditioning session. Or those times when we slept in our car because the thought of walking up the steps to get into our house where we would have to walk up another flight of stairs to get to the shower was just a miserable thought.

 

We learn mindset by pushing ourselves to the breaking point physically. Pushing those edges is where we learn our mind is much more powerful than our body. The mind drives the body beyond perceived thresholds. Then we do it again, and push even farther.

 

Is it necessary to train and practice at that level every time? No. 

 

Is it necessary to have trained and practiced at that level for a time? Yes.

 

 

Have a listen to Josh Hinger at the 8 minute mark in this video talk about the mindset of a champion, and the training intensity that this mindset brings to each session.

 

Then get some and go again.

 

 

The North Hollywood Shootout — tacticalprofessor

Claude Werner, the Tactical Professor, is someone I respect and look up to. His insights into violence, and violent encounters has shaped the way I approach training and preparation for the fight. I’m re-posting his blog post on the North Hollywood Shootout. Pay attention as Claude points out valuable lessons that apply to the private citizen. 

 

In the midst of the hullabaloo recently, a major historical even has been largely overlooked. On February 28, 1997, a huge shootout took place in North Hollywood (Los Angeles) California. On one side were two heavily armed and armored bank robbers. On the other side were hundreds of Los Angeles Police Officers. The shootout lasted […]

via The North Hollywood Shootout — tacticalprofessor

Shotgun Love

Doing some work recently on my home defense skill set. I was reminded of how versatile a shotgun can be as well as my life-long love of this beast. As a 10 year old kid I shot my first clay pigeon using a 410 single shot shotgun on my grandmothers farm in the heart of the Eastern Shore of Maryland. It’s a great memory of time with my dad, uncle, and great-uncles. Since then I’ve always loved and owned shotguns. Even this many years later there are few things firearms related that are as fun as an afternoon busting clays with friends and family.

The shotgun has maintained a significant position in the the defensive shooting world for good reason. However, it is interesting to watch things cycle through the defensive firearms world.

This month shotguns are out! Wait, because it is a month later and now shotguns are in! Sometimes it is like the weather in South Florida; don’t like it? Wait ten minutes, it’ll change.

Regardless of what’s hot at the moment, an ounce of lead moving at 1,600 feet per second is always going to make the shotgun a viable home defense option. Particularly for folks on a budget. For less than $500 you can pick up a solid pump gun, and enough ammo to function test your new shottie as well as a box of whatever defensive load you choose to run.

Of secondary interest are tactical considerations like backstops, fire lanes and such. This is just one choke point, and line in the sand in my home. The back stop is a concrete basement wall under the wood floor. A little higher is the tile and concrete entry way floor. Behind me are windows and an exterior wall so when I take incoming rounds I don’t have to worry about my family taking rounds meant for me. The walls on each side create a funnel, once in the stairs my opponent’s have two options: 1) come up the stairs into my muzzle or 2) go back down the stairs and away from my loved ones. There are no other options.

Home defense strategy and tactics is a fascinating study, and something I enjoy pressure testing on a regular basis. If you have neglected the shotgun and/or your home defense practice take some time to visit both again.