A Caliber and Capacity Post

Seriously. As crazy as it seems, I had this bright idea for a firearms related post. Particularly firearms a multidisciplinary practitioner would likely carry.

 

So of course I thought, how about one on caliber and capacity? I will preface this by saying I take a pragmatic approach to this subject.

 

Let’s dive headfirst into caliber. I’m not sure what caliber an ice pick might be but that caliber has wrecked a whole bunch of people. Same can be said for the screwdriver caliber. It seems that when one person introduces an icepick or screwdriver into another person’s aorta or brain, bad things follow. This isn’t always a life stopper, yet it’s effective enough often enough that simply googling the words ice pick death or screwdriver stabbing death yielded 4,810,000 results in 0.85 seconds. I realize this isn’t a very rigorous scientific study, yet despite this lack of rigor there might be something to it. Maybe it’s safe to say, within reason, where the hole is placed is as important as how big the hole might be? I don’t carry or recommend anyone carry anything smaller than a 9mm, particularly since M&P Shields, and Glock 43’s are tiny while still giving the user 6 – 8 rounds of 9mm in a super compact package. However, lots of folks are comfortable carrying smaller calibers such as Smith & Wesson revolvers in everything from 22LR to 38PL, or a Ruger LCP in .380. My absolute favorite pocket pistol is a Beretta 21 A Bobcat.  Regardless of what caliber one chooses just make sure it’s housed in a reliable, and accurate gun. You need the rounds to go where you intend for them to go, every time you intend for them to go there.

 

How much capacity is enough? In general I follow Tom Givens of Rangemaster advice which is to carry a pistol that has at least ten rounds on board the pistol. I’ve also spent quite a bit of my life carrying a single stack 1911 also known as God’s Gun which gives me 8 rounds on board the gun with several 10 round magazines in mag pouches on my belt. If we look at the data compiled by Tom Givens, the FBI, and DEA as well as the the NRA Armed Citizen we find when rounds are fired the average, (if we can call a life or death event average), defensive gun use involves between 3 – 5 rounds. In quite a few incidents the presence of the gun is enough to deter the criminal assault which means neither capacity nor caliber mattered when no shots were needed. Although my opponents unwillingness to fight isn’t something I’d want to bet the life of my loved ones on, it still gives credence to something James Yeager has been known to say which is; carry your damn gun.

 

Essentially I don’t think caliber or capacity matter unless you think it matters. We can find passionate, and convincing argument from both sides. I don’t think it’s possible to find a gun forum on the internet or a gun store counter that hasn’t been the site of a heated 9mm versus 45ACP debate. Everyone wants to believe they are carrying the magic bullet. However, it seems that whether the gun you choose has 5, 7, or 15 rounds of 22 LR or 45ACP on board isn’t as important as actually having the gun on you when you need it. Followed closely by the ability to put holes in your opponent’s vital areas specifically the upper chest, and/or the brain.

Steinbeck

So if I don’t think caliber, and capacity are overly important what do I think is? Skill and will. Know the limitations of your chosen weapon then train, and practice to circumvent those limitations to the best of you ability. Sometimes those limitations are imposed by our work environment. A large framed male working outdoors in an environment where he can wear loosing fitting clothing versus a small framed female in a closed environment where she wears scrubs will have to make choices based on challenges faced. A few resources I know, and have turned to for solid training, and advice regarding adapting to, and overcoming the challenges of small guns are; Claude Werner, thee Tactical Professor, Dr Sherman House, Legendary Lawman Chuck Haggard, and Chris Fry of MDTS. Each of those guys can get you up to speed on carrying, concealing, and running a full sized gun as well. 

Train intensely.

Train intelligently.

When the time comes be willing.

Everything else, including caliber and capacity, is supplemental.